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Schedule
Classroom Sessions

 

Open Discussions,
Workshops, and Roundtables

 

 

DAY ONE – SESSIONS I AND II   |   DAY TWO – SESSIONS III AND IV   |   FULL SCHEDULE

 

 

These sessions will provide opportunities for more intimate exchanges among attendees, special guests, Summit presenters, and both students and teachers from Boys and Girls High School campus. While diving deeper into urgent pedagogical issues, they will also address issues specific to the field of socially engaged art. The open discussion topics are different each session. Workshop and roundtable topics repeat from Session I to Session II and from Session III to Session IV.

 

Open Discussions function like panel discussions between three or four speakers, followed by responses from the audience.

 

Workshops take the form of hands-on, discursive activity between small groups of attendees.

 

Roundtables facilitate topic-driven conversations between speakers and a small group of participants.


 

 

Day One

Session I   2:30 – 3:30 PM
Session II   3:45 – 4:45 PM

 

 

Day Two

Session III   2:00 – 3:00 PM
Session IV   3:15 – 4:15 PM

 


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Day One

Open Discussions

 

Session I, 2:30 – 3:30 PM

 

 

AUDITORIUM

EDUCATION AND THE RIGHT TO THE CITY

Ingrid Haftel, Rachel LaForest, Jennifer A. Scott

 

 

ROOM 201

SOCIALLY ENGAGED ART IN THE GLOBAL CONTEXT

Tania Bruguera, Matteo Lucchetti, Judith Wielander

 

 

ROOM 102

THE COLLECTIVE IMPACT OF STUDENT, ACTIVIST,
AND ARTIST ENGAGEMENT IN CURRICULUM DESIGN

Stanley Kinard and students from Boys and Girls High School Campus

 

 

 

Session II, 3:45 – 4:45 PM

 

 

AUDITORIUM

SOCIALLY ENGAGED ART AND THE UNIVERSITY

Ann Messner, Marlène Ramírez-Cancio, Gregory Sholette, Daniel Tucker

 

 

ROOM 201

CONTEMPORARY PRACTICES IN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Janisha R. Gabriel, Gan Golan, Silvia Juliana Mantilla Ortiz

 

 

ROOM 104

MUSEUMS AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

Sandra Jackson-Dumont, Sheetal Prajapati, Sarah Schultz

 


 

 

 

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Day One

Workshops

 

Session I, 2:30 – 3:30 PM and Session II, 3:45 – 4:45 PM

 

 

ROOM 211

WHAT IS WINNING? & HOW TO WIN!

Artists and activists often focus on immediate problems, only rarely envisioning our desired outcomes. In this two-part workshop, the directors of the Center for Artistic Activism will expand the possibilities of what’s possible and share practical tools for getting there.

Led by Center for Artistic Activism

 

 

 

ROOM 210

SHAPESHIFTING: EXPRESSING OUR LIVES THROUGH MOVEMENT AND WORD

Participants in this workshop will use their bodies to tell stories and share experiences, using choreography inspired by discussion and writing exercises. Through embodied creative capacities, participants will collectively shapeshift and map new possibilities.

Led by Aimee Meredith Cox

 

 

 

ROOM 209

MUSEUM OCCUPATIONS: THE BACKSTAGE TOUR

Peek beyond the media screen. Contemplate the practical, emotional, artistic, and conceptual dimensions of direct action. Participants will discuss the skills most essential to organizing, from writing pithy manifestos, to dealing with the press, knowing your legal rights, and learning from mistakes. Why does it take a community to do this work and what public action is most urgently needed?

Led by Noah Fischer

 

 

 

ROOM 103

ONE HOUR OF TRUST FALLS

A troop of Flux Factory artists will lead this fast-paced and playful workshop that explores image-making and obsolescence. Participants will work in teams to create rayograph images using found objects in the classroom, then display them in the school halls. Expect a healthy dose of surprise and competition!

Led by Flux Factory

 

 

 

ROOM 105

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: LAND DIVE TEAM

“Breathing on Land” is an endurance exercise that combines scuba diving and meditation. Learn about Ginsburg’s ongoing exploration with the “Land Dive Team” and hone awareness of the environment, sound, and breath in a group meditation that entails breathing through full scuba gear.

Led by Hope Ginsburg

 

 

 

ROOM 205

A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO CLIMATE JUSTICE

Don’t know much about climate justice? Learn how justice relates to climate change and which organizations are working on these issues. Leave with tools and tactics to embark on climate justice research and take action! This workshop is part of a PERCENT FOR GREEN, an art project focused on addressing climate change in New York City’s environmental justice communities.

Led by Alicia Grullon


 

 

 

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Day One

Rountables

 

Session I, 2:30 – 3:30 PM and Session II, 3:45 – 4:45 PM

 

ROOM 204

WHO BENEFITS FROM THE AESTHETICS OF DETERMINED AUTONOMY?

Investigate self-sufficiency within communities comprised of
racial minorities or low-income communities. What is its historic necessity, its legacy, and its impact on neighborhood progress?

Led by Chloë Bass and Erica Mapp

 

 

 

ROOM 106

FREEDOM IN THE TIME OF FERGUSON

Join this creative exploration of cultural organizing and performative strategies. Discuss liberation pedagogy, actions aimed at interrupting police brutality, and ways to amplify self-determined safety in our communities.

Led by Betty’s Daughter Arts Collaborative

 

 

 

ROOM 101

GENDER GOES TO SCHOOL! GENDER NORMS, DISCRIMINATION, AND VIOLENCE IN SCHOOLS

Discuss what gender looks (or looked) like at your school. What roles do gender norms play in preventing or promoting gender discrimination and violence in academic settings?

Led by Breakthrough

 

 

 

ROOM 202

FOOD + ART: GROWING THE WHOLE CHILD

Discuss how to provide meaningful interdisciplinary and cross-cultural wellness experiences for students in formal and informal educational settings.

Led by Nicole Caruth and Petrushka Bazin Larsen

 

 

 

ROOM 206

BY LAW OR BY DESIGN: BUILDING LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS THAT WORK

Discuss current trends in education policy and legislation, such as No Child Left Behind, that promote high- stakes testing and accountability. How do they promote or undermine educationally effective school architecture and design?

Led by Adeola Enigbokan and Tracee Worley

 

 

 

ROOM 203

RECLAIMING COMMUNITY NARRATIVE AND IDENTITY FROM WITHIN

Learn about “Transform/Restore: Brownsville,” a two-year public art initiative with the mission to transform the narrative of Brownsville, Brooklyn. Through five large-scale mural projects, residents reframed and reclaimed the power to tell their stories and lived experiences in their own way.

Led by Daonne Huff

 

 

 

ROOM 205

FREE PEOPLE’S MEDICAL CLINIC WITH MASTER HERBALIST KAREN ROSE

How does an art practice that is underground or strategically invisible serve a social justice, community- oriented, and self-determined agenda?

Led by Simone Leigh

 

 

 

ROOM 207

THE WORK OF ART IN THE AGE OF BOYCOTT

Withdrawing one’s participation is a powerful and contested political option. The Gulf Labor Coalition boycott of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi is feted, while the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions movement’s opposition to the occupation through non-violent non-participation faces criticism. What makes only one of these forms of withdrawal a celebrated example of artist activism?

Led by Naeem Mohaiemen


 

 

 

DAY ONE – SESSIONS I AND II   |   DAY TWO – SESSIONS III AND IV   |   FULL SCHEDULE

 

 

 

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Day Two

Open Discussions

 

Session III, 2:00 – 3:00 PM

 

 

AUDITORIUM

ART AND POLITICS IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

Allison Davis, Tia Powell Harris, Shay Wafer

 

 

ROOM 201

THEORY OF PEDAGOGY

Pedro Lasch, Luis Camnitzer, Jolene Rickard

 

 

ROOM 102

WHAT GOVERNMENTS CAN LEARN FROM ARTISTS

Elizabeth Corr, Jane Golden, Lane Harwell

 

 

Session IV, 3:15 – 4:15 PM

 

 

AUDITORIUM

WRITING ON SOCIALLY ENGAGED ART

Sue Bell Yank, Ben Davis, Chloë Bass

 

 

ROOM 201

SUPPORTING SOCIALLY ENGAGED ART

Lisa Dent, Deborah Fisher, Risë Wilson

 


 

 

 

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Day Two

Workshops

 

Session III, 2:00 – 3:00 PM and Session IV, 3:15 – 4:15 PM

 

ROOM 208

OF SUPPLY CHAINS: A SOURCING-LABORING-EXCHANGING-ENCOUNTERING- ACQUIRING-DEPARTING KIND OF ART

What if the meaning of art could be found in the laborious hours of its production and deconstruction? Join a facilitated conversation about artists’ “work stories” and how narratives shift when the supply chain is taken into consideration. The teaching tools in this workshop were designed by Emilio Martinez Poppe, Susan Jahoda, and Caroline Woolard.

Led by BFAMFAPhD

 

 

 

ROOM 206

BROADSIDE BALLADS: HOW FORGOTTEN WORKER SONGS CAN INFLUENCE THE FUTURE

Did the Industrial Revolution ever end? Discover 19th-century British worker’s ballads and assess their contemporary significance. Learn about the history of these ballads and participate in an interactive exercise that connects history to contemporary labor issues.

Led by Jennifer Reid

 

 

 

ROOM 104

THE SCHOOL OF NARRATIVE DANCE: LESSON 0 AND CHOREOGRAPHY FOR VOICES

Join the The School of Narrative Dance, a free and nomadic school that proposes an alternative system of education based on principles of inclusion, emancipation, and skill-sharing. This is a two-part workshop that focuses on storytelling. Participate in an experimental dance lesson or make a sound piece with narrative dance.

Led by Marinella Senatore

 

 

 

ROOM 205

BEYOND THE SINGLE NARRATIVE

How can we develop learning environments wherein young people think critically about history by considering other perspectives, missing voices, and biases?

Led by Kameelah Janan Rasheed

 

 

 

ROOM 210

MOVEMENTS FROM THE SCHOOL OF ENGAGED ART

How do you construct and organize a collective body? Experiment with movements based on the morning exercises of The School of Engaged Art, and build a temporary collective body using experiential strategies. Physical activity is a key component of Chto Delat’s pedagogical practice.

Led by Chto Delat (Nikolay Oleynikov and Dimitri Vilensky)


 

 

 

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Day Two

Roundtables

 

Session III, 2:00 – 3:00 PM and Session IV, 3:15 – 4:15 PM

 

ROOM 202

ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

Discuss alternative forms of education and health services for young people, including home schooling and community-based knowledge sharing.

Led by Ras Kendall Albert and Chanel Porchia

 

 

 

ROOM 105

TEACHING TOWARD FREEDOM

Explore classroom practices from preschool through adult education that are aimed at helping people become more engaged citizens, better moral actors, and more courageous and imaginative thinkers.

Led by Bill Ayers

 

 

 

ROOM 211

CHALLENGING ROGUE FINANCIAL ENTITIES COLLECTIVELY

How can we work as a collective to address economic inequality and challenge the way we finance and gain access to public goods?

Led by The Debt Collective

 

 

 

ROOM 207

NAVIGATING THE CONTEMPORARY DIVIDE BETWEEN ARTS AND EDUCATION

Question prescribed roles for artists, teachers, and schools. Discuss who creates divisions between these roles and why. Consider the impact of these divisions on young people and how we can better integrate the arts and education.

Led by Fighting Obstacles Knowing Ultimate Success (FOKUS)

 

 

 

ROOM 209

COMMODIFICATION OF EDUCATION: COLONIALIST LEGACY IN SOUTH AFRICA

What is the symbolic legacy of British imperialist, mining tycoon, politician, and founder of Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) Cecil John Rhodes in the wake of the recent #RhodesMustFall protest movement, which called for the decolonization of education across South Africa? What are the socio- political and economic effects of white privilege vis-à-vis black abjection?

Led by Athi Mongezeleli Joja

 

 

 

ROOM 101

THE BLACK LUNCH TABLE: BLACK LIVES MATTER

The Black Lunch Table (BLT) is a collaborative project intended to augment documentation related to the histories of contemporary art and the African Diaspora. In this discussion, collect narratives and catalyze an ongoing community dialogue about the BlackLivesMatter movement.

Led by Heather Hart and Jina Valentine

 

 

 

ROOM 106

HOW CAN GATHERING SPACES BE USED TO MAINTAIN COMMUNITIES FACING GENTRIFICATION?

How do physical gathering spaces (like cultural institutions) and ephemeral gathering spaces (like powwows and Black Panther reunions) help splintered communities maintain their connection to the people and places that make them whole? How can we support these spaces in our communities?

Led by The Laundromat Project

 

 

 

ROOM 204

THE YES MEN WITHOUT THE PUNCHLINE (OR THE PERMANENT AUTONOMOUS ZONE)

Social practice art frequently experiments with temporary social relations. What if we aim to radically alter the institutions that structure or govern social relations? Can we do so not as a one-off joke or intervention, but as a permanent occupation or take-over?

Led by Not An Alternative

 

 

 

ROOM 103

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE SELF TAUGHT TODAY?

Is a formal education worth it? What practices are not taught in schools? Can self-taught practices be as valuable as institutionalized learning?

Led by Pepón Osorio

 

 

 

ROOM 203

REWRITING ART HISTORY CURRICULA BEYOND THE CANON

Art and art history function not only as academic content, but as disciplines that can boost the confidence, creativity, and long-term success of students. Discuss cultivating new curricula on the arts for young people that emphasize the histories of marginalized and overlooked artists.

Led by Jasmine Wahi

 

 

 


 

 

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DAY ONE – SESSIONS I AND II   |   DAY TWO – SESSIONS III AND IV   |   FULL SCHEDULE