Creative Time


About the Cohort

Avi

La Tanya S. Autry
She/Her/Hers
Shawnee Lands, Cleveland, OH

As a cultural organizer in the visual arts, La Tanya S. Autry centers collective care in her liberatory curatorial praxis. In addition to co-creating The Art of Black Dissent and the Social Justice & Museums Resource List, she co-produced #MuseumsAreNotNeutral, a global initiative that exposes the fallacies of the neutrality claim and calls for an equity-based transformation of museums. Her latest project, the Black Liberation Center, an experimental series of exhibitions, workshops, and programming, spotlights arts and culture that envision and strategize paths toward the freedom of all Black people, and thus, all people. Also, she has organized institutional exhibitions and programming at moCa Cleveland, Yale University Art Gallery, Artspace New Haven, and elsewhere. Autry, who is completing her Ph.D. in art history at University of Delaware, is examining the interplay of race, representation, memory, and public space in her dissertation The Crossroads of Commemoration: Lynching Landscapes in America.

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Caitlin Cherry
She/Her/Hers/They/Them/He/Him/His/Ze
Powhatan Lands, Richmond, VA
Caitlin Cherry draws on painting, sculpture, and installation in her multifaceted practice, coalescing into articulate and alluring representations of Black femininity. Filtering these media through layers of digital manipulation, her work draws parallels between Black femme bodies, frequently commodified and positioned as sexual assets, and the seductiveness of art objects in the commercial gallery circuit. Cherry is currently Assistant Professor of Painting and Printmaking at Virginia Commonwealth University and the founder of the new online program Dark Study, a contra-institutional space for radical learning about art and theory. Her paintings have been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, Performance Space New York, and The Studio Museum in Harlem, among other institutions of note. She is a recipient of a Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Fellowship Residency and Leonore Annenberg Fellowship.

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Che Gossett
They/Them
Lenapehoking, Brooklyn, NY
Che Gossett is a Black non-binary femme writer. In 2019–2020, they were a Helena Rubinstein Fellow in Critical Studies in the Whitney Independent Study Program. They are currently a graduate fellow at the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University, New Brunswick.

Avi

Kevin Gotkin
They/Them/He/Him/His
Lenapehoking, Brooklyn, NY

Kevin Gotkin is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Media, Culture, & Communication at NYU. Gotkin completed their Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 2018. Gotkin teaches and writes about disability, media, and public culture. In 2016, they co-founded an organization called Disability/Arts/NYC that works with the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs with the goal of getting disability arts represented in cultural policy—successfully lobbying for a $640,000 fund specifically for disability arts initiatives. Through Disability/Arts/NYC, they also trained two cohorts of activists and artists to disperse disability expertise around NYC, in addition to running programming around the city at the Whitney Museum, Brooklyn Museum, and more. Kevin Gotkin is also a DJ, party girl, and lover of nightlife artistry. They lead the REMOTE ACCESS party series, which is a disability-centric initiative developed with members of the Critical Design Lab that they help organize with Aimi Hamraie of Vanderbilt University.

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Sonia Guiñansaca
They/Them
Tovaangar, Los Angeles, CA & Lenapehoking/Manahatta, New York, NY
Sonia Guiñansaca is an internationally acclaimed poet, culture organizer, and activist. They emerged as a national leader in the migrant artistic and political communities where they coordinated and participated in groundbreaking civil disobedience actions. Guiñansaca co-founded some of the largest undocumented organizations in the US, including some of the first artistic projects by and for undocumented writers and artists. They have worked for over a decade in both policy and cultural efforts building infrastructures for migrant artists across the country. Their work has taken them to London and Mexico City to advise on migrant legislation, cultural interventions, and arts programming. Guiñansaca also consults for national social justice/cultural institutions and foundations on artist convenings, culture activations, and narrative strategies. As a writer and performer, they create narrative poems and essays on migration, queerness, and nostalgia, often collaborating with filmmakers and visual artists. They self-published their debut chapbook Nostalgia and Borders (2016).

Brett

Emily Johnson
She/Her/Hers

Lenapehoking/Manahatta, New York, NY
Emily Johnson is an artist who makes body-based work. She is a land and water protector and an activist for justice, sovereignty, and well-being. A Bessie Award-winning choreographer, Guggenheim Fellow, and recipient of the Doris Duke Artist Award, she is based in Lenapehoking / New York City. Johnson is of the Yup’ik Nation, and since 1998, has created work that considers the experience of sensing and seeing performance. Her dances function as portals and care processions. They engage audienceship within and through space, time, and environment—interacting with a place’s architecture, peoples, history, and role in building futures. Johnson is trying to make a world where performance is part of life; where performance is an integral part of our connection to each other, our environment, our stories, our past, present, and future.

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Prerana Reddy
She/Her/Hers
Rockaway Lands, New York, NY
Prerana Reddy is an independent cultural producer based in New York City working at the intersection of art, civic engagement, and social movements. She was most recently the Director of Programs at A Blade of Grass, a nonprofit that advances the field of socially engaged art through financial support for artists, public programming, research, and content creation. Previously, she was the Director of Public Programs & Community Engagement for the Queens Museum from 2005-2018 where she organized both exhibition-related and community-based programs with such renowned artists as Damon Rich, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Mel Chin, and Pedro Reyes. In addition, she hired the first full-time community organizers based at an art museum to develop long-term cultural organizing initiatives. These resulted in the creation and ongoing programming of a public plaza and a bilingual popular education center in collaboration with Tania Bruguera and Creative Time. She was also a film programmer and administrator for the 3rdi NY South Asian Film Collective, Alwan for the Arts, and the African Film Festival. She earned her M.A. in Cinema Studies and Anthropology from New York University and was a fellow of the Asian Pacific Leadership program at the East-West Center/ University of Hawaii-Manoa.

Avi

Namita Gupta Wiggers
She/Her/Hers
Multnomah, Clackamas, and Chinook Lands, Portland, OR

Namita Gupta Wiggers is an educator, curator, and writer. She is the Director of the M.A. in Critical Craft Studies program at Warren Wilson College, the first low-residency graduate program focused on craft history and theory. Wiggers directs Critical Craft Forum, an online platform for dialogue and exchange (available on Facebook, iTunes, Instagram, and sessions at College Art Association 2009–19). Wiggers served as the Curator (2004–12) and as the Director and Chief Curator (2012–14) at Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, OR. She contributes regularly to online and in-print journals and books and serves on the Editorial Boards of CRAFTS, Garland, Norwegian Crafts, and the Editorial Advisory Board of The Journal of Modern Craft. Current projects include a craft anthology and an ongoing research project with Benjamin Lignel on gender and adornment. She serves on the Board of Trustees of Haystack Mountain School of Crafts.

Ran

Hentyle Yapp
He/Him/His
Lenapehoking/Manahatta, New York, NY

Hentyle Yapp is an Assistant Professor at New York University in the Department of Art and Public Policy and affiliated faculty with the Departments of Performance Studies and Comparative Literature, Center for Disability Studies, and Asian/Pacific/American Institute. He is the author of Minor China: Method, Materialisms, and the Aesthetic (Duke University Press). He is also co-editor of Saturation: Race, Art, and the Circulation of Value (with C. Riley Snorton, MIT Press), which is on race and the art world. His essays have appeared in American Quarterly, GLQ, Verge, Women and Performance, and Journal of Visual Culture. He received his B.A. from Brown University in French Literature; J.D. from UCLA Law, specializing in Critical Race Theory and Public Interest Law; and Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in Performance Studies with a designated emphasis in Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Yapp is also a former professional dancer for companies in Taipei and NYC.